Monday, March 14, 2011

The Wild Wood


One tragic loss of the Great War was the area of Grand Lludd known as Wild Wood. Covering a hundred acres of farm and woodland, it was the home of varies species of anthropomorphic animals. Now much of the land has been despoiled, and most of its inhabitants have been killed or displaced.

These creatures were the product of biothaumaturgy and the eccentric genius of one man, Gaspard Mauro. Mauro gained the support of the crown in his endeavors by promising applications of his techniques in creating servitors to free mankind from hazardous labors.

His work never amounted to more than a curiosity.  Still, the Queen herself was quite fond of them, and on the occasion of her eighty-ninth birthday had a group of the animal-folk perform for her. There is one wax-cylinder recording said to exist of their cheeful, high-pitched singing.

Most of the animal-folk appear to have died in bombing during the war. There is evidence that some burrowing species may have survived, and there are worrisome reports that rats, taken to Communalitarianism, may have absconded with some of Mauro's notes, and are now undertaking a program of evolution and revolution among the rodent underclass of several cities.

11 comments:

Risus Monkey said...

Interesting to get your Communaltarian rats together with my Meowist, anthropomorphic cats of Faerie...

Trey said...

The question is, would there proletariat solidarity trump species differences? ;)

satyre said...

Doubtful. Some animals are more equal than other after all.

These remind me of Dr. Moreau in the League of Extraordinary Gentlemen comic; much fun. :)

Trey said...

Ha! You're right, of course. LoEG was one of the inspirations--though it was really finding that picture that made me want to write this one.

Eli Arndt said...

This is a lovely bit of smudged whimsy for your world.

I am a huge fan of anthro animals in fantasy or even non-anthro intelligent animals.

My own D&D campaign had a place where intelligent, anthro animals lived. Of course, for me it was in a blocked off section of sewer under the magic district of one of the great cities. Like yours, mine had their origins with a magical figure.

-Eli

JimShelley said...

Hundred Acres! Nice one!

Trey said...

@Eli - Thanks. Yeah, I think a bit of whimsy was an element of old school D&D that newer editions (3e on) don't emphasize as much. "Sumdged whimsy" is a great phrase, btw.

@Jim - Indeed. :) Always could to have those little easter eggs appreciated.

Chris said...

Whatever became of the infamous hot-rodding amphibians of the Wild Wood? Is it true they moved to the New World and took up barnstorming?

Trey said...

I've heard such, yes.

I do know there was a disinherited Toad descendent that indeed up a Vaudevillian, belting out "Hello My Ragtime Doll" and "Michigan Rag" nightly in an inebriated state.

Eli Arndt said...

Don't forget the one who married outside of his species and ran a semi-successful variety show!

Trey said...

Of course! How could I forget.