Monday, April 21, 2014

Infinite Earths

This a diagram of "major divergences" of parallel realities in Mark Gruenwald's A Primer on Reality in Comic Books. Things have only gotten more complicated since 1977.

DC has always had more alternate earths, thanks to their desire to explain away continuity errors by saying they took place in another reality (Marvel No-Prizes were simpler), but then Crisis came and they got rid of them all. After a few more crises, they came back though. Check out a list of them here.

Marvel traditionally had very few and didn't give them number (too DC, I guess). In 1983, Alan Moore and Alan Davis did a story for Marvel UK where the main Marvel earth was given the designation 616. Fans ran with that, and from a throwaway line, Marvel parallel Earths got numbers, too. Find them here. Of course, this probably doesn't catalog all the dystopian alternate futures the X-Men wind up in. Those guys just can't catch a break.

Any, I'm sure all of this can be plenty useful for a superhero game.

4 comments:

Chris C. said...

Wow. That's a lot of earths. And at the very least, it justifies re-writing "history" through the game, simply by giving the game world a new alternate universe reason for existing. For other genres too, of course, like a Middle Earth campaign where the ring doesn't get destroyed, etc.

Trey said...

it is indeed a lot of Earths. I agree, parallel worlds could be used more in fantasy settings. It's also possible some planes could be accounted for in this way.

Alexander Osias said...

A spelljammer game could be justified as riding the time streams as well...

Justin S. Davis said...

I've never seen that image before. Neat!